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RoadRace Factory Team rebuilds bike during red flag

Dion Device Brake Lever Guard at Infineon from Dion Device Brake Lever Guard on Vimeo.

Dion Device brake lever guard team rider Hayden Gillim crashed when a rider directly in front of him went down. It was up to the RoadRace Factory team to rebuild his wrecked bike during the red flag. Against all odds, the team had Hayden back on the grid, of which he had to start dead last among 37 other riders. With bent forks and the rest of the grid against him, Hayden rode the tires off his bike and finished top ten on an ever-so-special race weekend. Film and Edit by Dion Device brake lever guard.

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First seen on TrackdayMag

Motorcycle Roadracing Association

Motorcycle Roadracing Assoc. Super Street promo from 1930pictures on Vimeo.

Modern sportbikes belong at the track. Find out how to get there and get up to speed, with Colorado’s own MRA

http://www.mra-racing.org/
https://www.facebook.com/MotorcycleRoadracingAssociation

The MRA kicks off it’s 2012 season at High Plains Raceway on May 5-6th! Join us for non stop high octane excitement as the fastest riders in the region race head to head on everything from 250cc production motorcycles to 200hp open superbikes!

The hugely successful Super Street class returns for its third season on Saturday. If you’re a street or trackday rider and would like to experience road racing for only $100 and minimal bike prep, go to http://forums.mra-racing.org/viewtopic.php?t=12495 for more information.

Tickets for all MRA races are purchased at the event gate each Saturday and Sunday. Don’t miss the experience and excitement of motorcycle roadracing here in Colorado!

Weekend Admission: Adults $10 for the entire weekend of racing. Kids under 12 and military personnel are free! Stop by your local motorcycle dealer for a 2 for 1 admission voucher.

Directions: High Plains Raceway is located on U.S. Highway 36, 17 miles east of Byers. This is 60 miles(and less than one hour) east of the I-25 & I-70 interchange, known locally as the Mousetrap. At Byers, exit I-70 (which bends to the south towards Limon) taking Highway 36 due east 17 miles. The track is on your left, with the entrance at the Easternmost side of the property.
Information: Call (303) 769-4771
Website: www.highplainsraceway.com

The MRA is dedicated to promoting safe and competitive motorcycle roadracing events for enthusiasts in Colorado and the surrounding area. For more information go to www.mra-racing.org

For a daily schedule of races go to http://http://forums.mra-racing.org/viewtopic.php?t=14375

Sunday Ride in the Hills

A fun day up in the twisties, lots of bicycles enjoying the road too, gorgeous day in Colorado!



Thefts from Performance Cycle of Colorado–help us catch


Hey guys we need your help! Unfortunately on Wednesday, 4/18/12, at Performance Cycle an Icon Accelerant Black XL jacket, an Icon Motorhead Black XL jacket, an Shoei RF-1100 TC-5 Large Helmet and an Icon Shakki White XL Helmet were stolen. We are a family owned business and it’s a shame that people like this are a part of our sport. If you recognize the men in the pictures below, please help us find them. A reward will be given for information that leads to finding them and getting the products back. Any information can be anonymously given to Lance at 720-289-4984. Thank you!

More info

Buell Fun

Buell fun from alex rios on Vimeo.

Leslie Porterfield

Leslie Porterfield Run-1142
Photo by Teddy Danh



 

Leslie Porterfield is the “Fastest Woman in the World on a Motorcycle.” Well qualified, her top average through the mile is 240 miles-per-hour!

She owns her motorcycle shop in Dallas called High Five Cycles. Opened in 2005, her shop is a non-franchised pre-owned motorcycle dealership.

All has not gone smoothly. In 2007, she had a bad accident at Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah. “I actually didn’t break any records. I broke seven ribs, punctured a lung and had a concussion and I came off the bike at a little over 100 miles-an-hour”, Porterfield said. That didn’t stop her, she rebuilt the bike, and got back on.

“Racing’s a very personal thing, almost a spiritual thing,” she said. “It really takes a lot of personal awareness to set the record. It takes a lot of patience, a lot of focus and prep to be able to go that fast. It’s definitely not a sport for everyone, and it’s definitely not all machine.”

Leslie would like to go beyond, “I’d like to be the fastest person in the world on a motorcycle.” On the flipside, this year Leslie set the World’s SLOWEST record on two wheels on a Honda Ruckus 50cc. This will most likely get her another Guinness Book entry. Just another day for Leslie.

The 33 News channel article on Leslie
Article on Ultimate Motorcycling
Article on CNN’s blog
Leslie’s own website

Advanced Training Report: Yamaha Champions Riding School

This article courtesy of the Naval Safety Center Smart Ride 2011 Magazine. Please also check out their website, the Naval Safety Center.

BY UT1 (SCW) CLINTON WALDORF,
SmartRide Fleet Editor

In March I attended the two-day Yamaha Champions Riding School (YCRS) at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. This course is led by Nick Ienatch, who formerly instructed at Freddie Spencer’s riding school and assisted the Navy, Marine Corps and Motorcycle Safety Foundation in creating the Military Sportbike Rider Course. Nick is a highly renowned sport riding expert and is the author of Sport Riding Techniques. I knew this was going to be some good training.

My purpose for attending was to improve my skills and become a better, safer, and faster rider. Whether you’re an avid rider, occasional track day guy, or just a weekend warrior, I believe every rider will get something valuable from this type of training. More than that, I think everyone should attend a course like this. If you were a golfer and wanted to improve your swing, wouldn’t you seek out a local professional for help? This is exactly what I did for my motorcycle riding skills and I am glad I did. Money well spent.

YCRS is kept to small numbers of 10 to 12 students. This keeps instructor-to-student ratios very low, allowing for plenty of one-on-one time and feedback from instructors. There was a mixed level of experience, including a first time track rider, repeat students, amateur racers, the owner of Silver Star Clothing Company, and even ESPN X-games BMX Gold Medalist Chad Kagy.

At the course, students ride the latest Yamaha R6 and R6Rs and groups are separated based on experience level. Since I had a handful of track days under my belt, I fell into the medium-to-faster paced group. I was comfortable with this pace and on occasion, I had to push to keep up with the faster riders of the group and the instructor’s pace.

DAY 1

We started in the classroom with introductions and then got right to business. We covered braking, reading the circuit and types of corners, levels of risk, non-negotiables (more on that in a sec) and more braking. By the way, if you don’t get a bite to eat at the hotel, YCRS will have a spread laid out for you, with food and drinks and a hot lunch. If you don’t have your own leathers and gear you can rent the latest Alpinestars gear from the school. This is especially helpful if you are flying into Las Vegas and want to save some space and weight in the luggage.

After the classroom brief, students and Nick packed into the passenger van for a few laps on the Las Vegas Infield Circuit. Nick spent plenty time explaining each corner in detail: early apex, late apex, entry, exit and getting the motorcycle pointed for what is next.

“Non-negotiables” were discussed as well. What are they, you ask? These are the basics that form your riding foundation: items that do not change and things you must or must not do. One example is being smooth on the controls. You cannot be jerky in your use of controls; this is non-negotiable. With each lap in the van, the driver increased the speed of the over-loaded passenger van and demonstrated the braking and line that is required. It’s important to know the circuit.

We exited the van at one of the last corners of the circuit, while one of Nick’s instructors rode a few easy laps on his Yamaha to warm his tires. Nick took the opportunity to give us a lesson on braking. Were you taught never to use the brakes while cornering? I was, and this was all about to change. He also taught us about trail braking. YCRS motorcycles’ brake lights are kept functional to show you how far it is possible to brake in corners (trail braking). Students were standing just off the track while instructors were cornering a few feet in front of us—giving the lesson of a lifetime in trail braking. Many drills were conducted based on trail braking and other braking techniques and we learned a ton about improving one of the motorcycle’s most critical—if not the most critical—controls.

I will not tell all the secrets of Nick’s school, because it really has to be experienced. However, I will say this: “Braking, braking and more braking.”

Brakes are a multi-positional control, and not just an on or off switch. When used correctly, you are not only able to adjust your speed, but you also have the ability to change the motorcycle’s geometry and create a better-steering bike. For example, does your front end dip when you apply front brakes? This changes the geometry of your motorcycle to a more easily turning machine. When coming to a stop, does your front end dip dramatically and then rebound back? If so, you aren’t controlling your brakes well. You should have some front end dipping of course, but it should return smoothly. This is practiced each time you bring your motorcycle to a stop.

We put all this and more to the test with day-one drills. A fantastic drill that we worked on was called the “pointy end of the cone.” In several corners of the circuit, instructors placed a traffic cone on its side. We had to adjust our motorcycle in mid-corner, including steering, braking, and lean angle, to negotiate to the pointy side of the cone and then exit the corner to the next challenge. The key to this drill is looking well ahead in the corner. What makes this drill so effective is that the instructors were standing off-track observing our skills, and moving the cone each lap. We never got the same scenario twice, which forced us to constantly adjust to each corner.

To brake and clutch with four fingers or two? That is the question. Many of us are taught to brake and clutch with four, but all you really need is two. You have far better control and feeling when using two fingers on the brakes, with the other two still in control of the throttle. When clutching, you really only need a small amount of lever pull to unload the engine to up-shift. On the down-shift the two fingers provide added control on the left bar and again more precise control than four fingers. This is something that definitely takes some getting used to and a lot of practice.

Body positioning, and hanging off the bike is also covered. This is where the mantra “Look GP to Ride GP” comes in. Hanging off the bike decreases the motorcycle’s lean angle in a corner. This is necessary to increase your lap times on a track and proven by the pros to work. However, motorcycle lean angle also decreases grip and increases your risk. You want to decrease your risk, yet remain fast. Many riders may get their lower body off the bike or their knee down, and increased lean angle and may not even be necessary. This is increasing the risk! Learning and practicing correct body position will definitely decrease your risk and increase your fun.

Ever two-up ride with an instructor? This is an amazing learning tool. During most of the day, I struggled with heavy braking, as do many riders, learning how hard I can actually brake. Riding with instructor Ken Hill for a lap as a passenger made me realize the bike can brake much harder than I had ever realized. It felt like I was on the edge of going over the front, yet in full control of the motorcycle.

“What’s next?” is another constant mantra. Successful riders need to be looking and thinking in this manner constantly – in each corner entry, apex and exit. Everything you do on the bike requires thinking several steps ahead. What next? Where do I need to put the bike for the entry, then to the apex and then pointed out of the corner to the next corner. This is repeated to you constantly and asked of you routinely from Nick and staff. “What’s next Clinton?”


DAY 2

We moved from the infield course to the Las Vegas Classic Course that is outside the oval. Again we spent a few laps in the van with Nick to learn the new course. Using what Nick taught us in day one, this was easily accomplished. Then we were on the bikes to take a few sighting laps and warm our tires.

We spent the first day concentrating on the use of our front brakes. Day two we practiced a drill of using only the rear brakes for a few laps and it can be done—not as fast but it can be done—again concentrating on controlling the brakes.

Ever take your left hand off the steering wheel while cornering? Not on the streets I hope. I have only seen this done by the pros and now the instructors showed us how it’s done and told us we were going to do it ourselves. My first thought was “no way.” However, it wasn’t done to look cool, but to teach us control. Once the motorcycle is pointed and turned in the corner, and as long as you maintain a consistent throttle, you can do this. At first I barely let go of the left grip. After a few laps practicing this skill, I was pointing to the apex cones like the instructors and smiling from ear to ear in my helmet.

Next we got to follow the instructors around the course, but they were not taking the racing lines. They would ride erratically, braking and turning in early, running wide in corners, and many other scenarios to see if we would follow them or keep the correct lines. This was a highly effective drill for concentrating on the correct lines. It’s excellent for street riders, teaching them not to get sucked into mistakes that other riders make in front of them.

After that, we got off the bike for a lesson in one of the corners. We watched Ken Hill demonstrate incorrect braking and cornering and were asked to identify the problem. Late braking, early braking, running wide, abrupt throttle control—many different scenarios were demonstrated. Now, what to do to correct them? As a group we discussed what we learned and how to apply the skills to correct these problems. These up close and personal demonstrations made the learning far more effective.

My favorite drill of Day two was a braking competition. Students lined their motorcycles at the top of a small hill. While in neutral, we coasted the bike until we reached a braking marker and there we applied the brakes. Whoever can keep the brake light on and coast the furthest wins! This teaches you the fine art of braking, how little you can apply your brakes and what a useful tool your brakes can be.

Right now, you may be thinking to yourself, “I am not a track day rider and this training pertains to the track.” I disagree. Where are the majority of crashes on the street? In corners right? What if you could train yourself to adjust mid-corner effectively and safely? This is a huge benefit to any motorcycle rider. To accurately control braking and use this as tool to adjust speed and bike geometry, makes the motorcycle turn more effectively and gives any rider an advantage on the track or the street. If you think the latest exhaust or a new ECU is going to make you a faster or better rider, try spending the money on the best training instead. For the cost of the latest upgrades that will only last a few a years, you can invest in training and knowledge from the Yamaha School or other reputable course. For any rider, this knowledge is an investment in skills for a lifetime of riding safely and improvement.

Installing a Headlight Modulator for Safety

This article courtesy of the Naval Safety Center Smart Ride 2011 Magazine. Please also check out their website, the Naval Safety Center.

BY PETE HILL, CMC Safety Division Safety Engineer

Recently, I decided to add a headlight modulator to my bike. For those not aware of this technology, a headlight modulator is installed in the power supply to your headlight and makes the intensity of the light fluctuate during daylight hours.

WHY?
The reason to install a modulator is that it increases the visibility of the bike to car drivers. Having your headlights on during the day used to mean you were either a motorcycle, or in a funeral procession. Since the advent of daytime running lights on cars, the single motorcycle headlight does not stand out like it once did. The modulator is a game changer in this area. This device improves visibility any time the motorist has a frontal view of the motorcycle – for instance, the driver in oncoming traffic who is making a left hand turn, a driver pulling into traffic, or a driver moving in the same direction who may potentially change lanes into the path of a motorcycle. In the latter situation, riders should consider a lane position that maximizes the motorists’ probability of seeing the headlight in their side mirrors.

LEGAL
Modulators are a legal lighting accessory in all 50 states. While it may appear that they are alternating between high and low beam, they are actually only alternating the intensity between about half to full intensity of the high or low beam setting.

DAYTIME USE ONLY
There are different features and configurations that are offered with modulators. All modulators include a photocell that turns the modulation feature off at dusk, which is a DOT requirement. You cannot change the setting of the photocell but can influence its operation by where you place it on the motorcycle. The instructions for mine recommended placement in a position pointing downward to protect the cell from the elements. I installed it pointing downward in the cowl above the speedometer/tachometer cluster. Because it does not receive direct sunlight, it turns modulation off earlier than if it were aimed at the sky.

OTHER FEATURES
Another feature the user can control is whether the modulation operates on high beam, low beam, or both. I set mine to both, which means during daylight, the headlight modulates regardless of whether the beam is set on high or low. Some riders may prefer to limit modulation to the low beam only or high beam only. My modulator allows the rider to toggle the modulation on or off by rapidly switching between high and low beam, returning the headlight to non-modulated operation. This feature is helpful if you need to aim the headlight or measure its normal operating intensity. Another feature is an interconnection to the bike’s horn that causes a rapid modulation of the light when the horn button is pressed.

WHAT MOTORISTS SEE
The advertising and literature on modulators do not hype this aspect, but I believe one characteristic of headlight modulation that helps get the attention of motorists is that it mimics the modulation of headlights installed on many law enforcement vehicles. The fluctuating intensity gets the motorist’s attention and the first association may be that there is law enforcement following. It may prompt him or her to put down the Big Mac and hang up the phone. Regardless, anything that helps motorists see a bike is a good thing.

COST
The module I bought costs about $60. These can be obtained on the internet or from your local bike shop. Bike shops may charge $100 or more to install, depending on the size and complexity of the hookup. Soldering connections costs more in labor but is preferred over using crimp connections that come with the kit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EASY TO INSTALL
Installation is a fairly easy process for the rider, and step by step instructions are included. If you do not want a certain feature (like the horn-triggered modulation or high beam modulation) you simply do not connect those wires. Some modulators are larger than others. My unit is about the size of a matchbox with six twelve-inch wire leads. I mounted it up and under the console cover of my Pacific Coast 800. I did the installation in conjunction with replacing the windshield. Getting behind the plastic can be a challenge. Cruiser riders may want to select smaller modules if they want to install them inside the headlight housing.

Amazon link to Headlight Modulators

Vyrus 986 M2 — just a little different

The Vyrus 986 M2 is a custom racer built on a Honda CBR600RR engine, and uses the engine as a stressed member, and no telescopic forks. Instead of forks, it uses rods, levers to connect to the handle bars. Built by Ascanio Rodorigo of Italy, the steering is called hub-center steering, which can provide huge advantages on the track, keeping weight balance neutral. Will this setup bring about a huge change in the future of suspension?

Most of the body is carbon fiber monococque, reducing weight. Vyrus plans to introduce a race ready bike, a street legal sportbike, and a kit bike (bolt in your own CBR600 engine).

Article on MCN
Article on Gizmag
Article at CycleWorld